What inspires you to write more often in your blog?

It’s kind of timely that just over a week after launching my new theme on UnfoldingNeurons.com with a desire to write more posts I come across two great articles talking about how to be inspired to write.

John Saddington wrote 10 Types of Blog Posts That Helped Me Blog 3 Times a Day for a Year. I had the privilege of meeting John at the ChurchCrunch one year birthday party before a conference I recently attended.  He’s fairly new to the blogging scene but let me tell you as a blogger he has come a long way in a short period of time.  In the words of Micheal Hyatt at the party, “I’ve never seen a more productive person”.  So, this article quickly caught my eye.  If such a busy person as John can blog so frequently, so consistently – how does he do it?  Here’s some of the types of blog posts that stood out to me as things I could do very easily here:

  • Date Specific – picking a day to do a regular systematic themed post (i.e. desktop of the week etc.). Not sure how I’m going to do this yet (or what theme/topic I’d do) but it is something I could do.

One year of Unfolding Neurons…missed the anniversary!

I’ve been struggling with a little bit of writer’s block for some time now. It’s not that I don’t have anything to write about – it’s just that I’ve been so overwhelmed with things happening in my life the last few months and the things I want to get done that writing entries to my blog has slowly made it’s way to the bottom of the to-do list.

Tonight I was just doing some reading and realized that I missed the one year birthday of Unfolding Neurons! May 13, 2006 was when I wrote my first article entitled “First Post” – I know, creative isn’t it? Back then Unfolding Neurons was known as ‘Yet another Ramble’, and was just an experiment trying out the new blogging software I came across called WordPress. In the past year I’ve grown to really love WordPress. I experimented with different themes, finally went out and got my own domain name (changing Yet Another Ramble to Unfolding Neurons in the process), created a new website to host the sermons that I preach at my church (using WordPress of course), redid my church website to use WordPress, created a family blog using WordPress, learned a lot of PHP and MySql and strengthened my knowledge of .css and html/x-html, designed a couple themes (not publicly released…too embarrassing), and released a WordPress plugin I wrote for organizing series of articles.

Choosing WordPress: “She’s got guts”

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Wordpress as a CMS

In the previous article in this series I introduced the first reason for why I chose to use WordPress as the engine for three CMS-like sites that I designed recently. I wrote about the theming/template system in WordPress – the “looks”. In this article I’m going to talk about the “guts” of WordPress.

Why I chose WordPress

2. The Guts

When I refer to guts, I mean the following things that are “inside” the WordPress engine:

i. File Structure

From the perspective of a newbie developer, the WordPress file structure greatly aids in comprehending where things are and what files need to be edited/looked at in the development process. The fact that directory trees and file names are descriptive of their function cuts down on a lot of the guesswork into where things are located.

Here’s the layout of the directory tree structure:

/wordpress (root): You’ll find all the main configuration and base level files such as config.php (database settings), wp-blog-header.php (calls necessary includes and header information), and various feed related files among others. I’m not going to go into detail about each of the files but I’ll just mention that for the most part, the files in the root wordpress directory are what WordPress accesses when initializing.

Choosing WordPress: “ooo doesn’t she LOOK fine?”

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Wordpress as a CMS

In the previous article in this series I gave a summary of some of the core differences between a CMS (content management system) and a blogging engine. I talked about some of the cases where one system is more preferable over the other when designing websites. In the conclusion to the article I mentioned that in light of what I had just written, it would have made more sense for me to go with a CMS for the website designs of Hanover Pentecostal Church, UnashamedSermons.com, and VigliottiWoodworking. Yet, as can be observed from the title of the series I obviously used WordPress instead. This article will focus on the first reason for why I made that choice.

But before I get to that I’ll give a quick rundown of some of the requirements that needed to be considered for each site.

UnashamedSermons.com
UnashamedSermons.com UnashamedSermons.com is where I host all the various sermons I have (and still am!) written and preached while pastoring at my church. There were predominately two purposes for me creating UnashamedSermons. One, I wanted a place where I could archive all my messages and access it for personal reference. Two, I wanted to make available to as many people possible these messages in the hopes more people would be impacted.

CMS vs. Blog…no you don’t need Pepto Bismol

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Wordpress as a CMS

{this is part 2 of the series “WordPress as a CMS”}

WordPress is primarily a blogging tool (or engine as I like to call it!) but I’ve learned in the course of designing three websites that are not primarily blogs that WordPress can also cross over and serve somewhat nicely as a Content Management System (CMS). In the second article of this series I want to talk a little bit about the difference between a CMS and a blog and then in the next article I’ll talk about how this played into my decision to use WordPress for the design of UnashamedSermons.com, VigliottiWoodworking.com, and gohpc.net.

On the surface it may seem that there isn’t much difference between a CMS and a Blog. They both provide some sort of backend interface for administrators to manage the content of the website. They both invite social interactivity via the ability for visitors to leave comments, register as a user, or even become a contributor to the content. Then of course the primary focus of each is the delivery of some sort of content which in later years has involved not only pictures and text but also videos and audio (podcasts and the like). But surface appearances can be deceiving!