Organize Series 2.0.8beta Release

Patience pays off – for those of you waiting for a version of Organize Series that will work with the latest version of WordPress (currently WP 2.6.2)!  I just want to give a shout out to all the people who have been trying to hack up fixes in the interim instead of just waiting (and a thanks to Matthew Porter who emailed me his version of a fix – which I used a section of).  One of the  major hurdles keeping me from releasing even just this beta is that my “unique” “automatic-series-part-ordering” system was horribly broken by the new revision system introduced with WordPress 2.6.   The fixes offered up by others worked for adding new series but if you  modified an existing post that is a part of a series and reordered it in the series then things would go haywire.  So, I needed time to test and fix – which I haven’t had much of.  Well today, sitting at my wife’s bedside in the hospital while she sleeped (and staying up a bit later too) I managed to hack off this beta.  Here’s the rough changelist:

  • Fixed the bug that caused an incorrect url for the “Manage->Series” and “Settings->Series” pages.  My fix should work for all future versions of WP.
  • Added a fix to allow OrgSeries to work as expected if users customize the location of their wp-content folder (which was made possible with WordPress 2.6+)
  • Added fix for any calls made to the ‘wp-config.php’ file in orgSeries (see here for my reference)
  • Think I’ve nailed the “future-posts-that-are-a-part-of-a-series-showing-up-live” bug that’s been reported by some users.  If you “future-publish” a post that is part of a series it shouldn’t show up on your live blog to users anymore.
  • And of course fixed the incorrect numbering of parts in the series issues brought on by the new revisions feature in WordPress 2.6+
  • There are more fixes/updates in this version as well – you can see the full changeset here.
Remember: THIS IS A BETA – that means that you are using this at your own risk (well, you use the stable version at your own risk too…).  I cannot guarantee any support if you run into problems (but I do try to help where I can).  I’m releasing this early as a beta so I can see if any guinea pigs report any problems with using it before I put it up on wordpress.org.  I’m going to be testing on WP2.7 as well before I publish it as stable. What I can say is that Unfolding Neurons is now upgraded to WP2.6.2 with Organize Series 2.0.8beta and I’m not noticing any problems.
Have fun – and if you DO decide to give it a go…PLEASE report any bugs you find in this thread.  I’ll collect the bugs as they come in and fix when I can.
Thanks for your patience folks (and for the kind words from some of you in the interim 😉 )
Woops, almost forgot….Here’s the download –> Organize Series 2.0.8b
UPDATE: The link to download the beta now gives you beta 2.

Showing off Your Series: Series List

This entry is part 10 of 10 in the series Organize Series Usage Tips

This series is no longer available on UnfoldingNeurons.com because I’ve moved all posts related to this plugin to the new home at OrganizeSeries.com. You can read about the move here and here.

WordPress as a CMS – Introduction

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Wordpress as a CMS

Here’s the promised first post in a series of articles I am going to write over the next month about the challenges and benefits of using WordPress as a content-management system (CMS).

Now I know that this topic has been covered fairly well already on the blogosphere – I’m not so naive as to think that I’m somehow setting a trend by writing this series! I am writing this series primarily as an excercise of recording for my own benefit some of the problems I ran into and the solutions I came up with in the process of designing a wordpress cms website.

In the course of these articles I’ll be referencing three websites that I’ve designed in the past 6 months as a CMS: vigliottiwoodworking.com, gohpc.net, and unashamedsermons.com. Here are some of the topics I’ll cover:

  • CMS vs. a blog – what’s the difference and how to you determine what is used? (among other questions I found myself asking when designing a site around WordPress)
  • Challenges that face a developer when using WordPress as a CMS.
  • Benefits for using WordPress as a CMS
  • Recommended WordPress plugins for WordPress as a CMS. (I’ll also talk about some custom coding (and plugins) I did along the way to aid in the transition.
  • Theming a CMS site – designing from scratch vs. modifying an out-of-the-box (and open-source) theme.
  • Helpful tools to aid in developing and publishing a WordPress CMS site.

That’s just a few of the topics I’m planning on covering at this point. Of course as I start writing other “branches” may occur to me and I’ll travel down the more interesting ones. If there’s any topics/questions you think of as you read any of these articles – make sure you leave it in the comments and I’ll try to incorporate what you ask in future posts.

Now for the important disclaimer: Although I’ve had the pleasure of dissecting and learning the way WordPress works as I’ve experimented with it over the past half a year I definitely don’t consider myself a WordPress expert! Although these articles may read as “how-to” instructions at times, the reality is that this series is more about chronicling the things I’ve learned than professing any expert understanding of WordPress workings. There’s a good chance that some of the things I write about are actually a hard way of going about doing things and if so, I can only hope that a WordPress “expert” comes along and comments about it so I can learn something more (and make my work a bit more efficient in the process hehe).

By the way…something I’ve found to be true…coding is poetry!